travel

Corrugation

as seen in Bodie


Bodie

We took a day trip from Lone Pine to the famous ghost town, Bodie, which is now a state park. Bodie is interesting and fun for everyone, but is especially beloved by photographers. I was intrigued by the angles and shapes of the buildings contrasting with the almost cloudless skies that day- and had to force myself to take photos of some of the wonderful vintage items on display (those are usually my favorites). This is one shot of the shapes and angles of Bodie, but I edited it three ways for fun.


Welcome to Manzanar

On our last day in Lone Pine, Lonnie and I spent a couple hours at Manzanar, the Japanese internment camp which is now a National Historic Site through the National Park Service. It was a sobering experience, but learning about this part of our history is important for all Americans.

Although the original buildings were torn down after the war, replicas have been rebuilt in the footprints of the originals, so one can get a sense of what this place was like during the war years.

 

 


Backdrop

The mountains behind the Alabama Hills made a beautiful backdrop as Lonnie and I drove through the dirt side roads of this fascinating area which was the setting for so many old western movies. This is a zoomed in view of Mr. Whitney behind the hills.

 

 


Whitney Portal

Whitney Portal Road goes from Lone Pine through the Alabama Hills and then starts its ascent up the mountain to 8,389 feet, where it ends at Whitney Portal. There are spectacular views of the hills below and of the mountain itself.


Mobius Arch

We have just returned from a fantastic trip to Lone Pine, California with my photo group. The goal was to see the Alabama Hills where many old movies, especially westerns, were filmed. It is a beautiful area with Mt. Whitney as a backdrop, and few in our group had ever been there. I wasn’t sure how I would do on this trip, because I knew that to see much of the area I would have to do a lot of walking. But my knee held up great, and with the help of my trekking poles, I was able to actually do a short hike up and down on uneven ground in order to take advantage of one of the iconic photo ops- the view of Mt. Whitney as seen through Mobius Arch.

BTW, to take this photo, you have to lie on your back on top of a boulder.


Just pretty . . .

A pretty view at the Alaska Native Heritage Center


Watercolors

Eagle River, Alaska reflections


Days Gone By

Below is an image from the old Independence Mine in Alaska. The old-timey look of these old-timey buildings was enchanced using the selective focus of a Lensbaby lens and some tones and textures in Photoshop.


Ancient Spirit

Friday Photo Art from our trip to Alaska


Windmill Garden

Usually I take shots out the car window of wind turbines as we drive to and from California- they fascinate me. This time, we actually drove over near the turbines so I could take photos to my heart’s content. This one is a bit of a fantasy- a multiple exposure edited with textures and NO RULES for sure! 🙂


One of the 26

Back to the 26 Glacier Cruise in Alaska- here is one of the twenty-six! I think this was just the first glimpse.

Actually, for me, the best part of the above image is the reflection- hence this crop:


Shadow Play

I spotted the shadows on these steps at the Tehachapi train station and loved the lines and patterns they made. I decided to emphasize the graphic design qualities of this shot by doing a little . . . ummm . . .creative editing.


Choo Choo

Last week’s road trip back home managed to yield a few photos despite our disappointment about not getting to Monterey.. We spent the night in Tehachapi and went over to the train station so I could have the opportunity to find something (ANYTHING!) to photograph. We had been there a couple times before and knew there were some old railroad items on display. Below is a view of the wheels on an old box car.

Edited with some grunge textures and filters.


Unexpected

We have just returned from a road trip to the San Francisco Bay Area, and this is the first photo I’ve posted since our return (last week’s and Monday’s photos were scheduled in advance before we left). Our trip was supposed to be a two day business trip for my husband followed by a long weekend in Monterey (which was supposed to include lots of photo opportunities. . .). Unfortunately, I had to take my husband to the ER the second night we were in the Bay Area- and he ended up being hospitalized for 5 days! He is much improved now, and “normal” life has resumed.

On the last day he was in the hospital, I brought my camera with me and photographed parts of an art installation across from the main entrance. Since I first saw it, I had been captivated by this piece of art, which forms a semi-wall in front of the parking area. I decided to practice my multiple exposure skills in photographing it, because I didn’t want to just capture someone else’s art- I wanted to create my own.

When I got home and downloaded my images, I was struck by how the jagged lines resembled the parts of the display I was constantly seeing on the monitor at his bedside- as if they were stacked upon each other. Is this why I was so attracted to it? Or does it represent the chaos of dealing with a medical situation while on vacation? I don’t know- but this is the result.

Shifting Realities:

Being a photographer who likes simple compositions, I have to say I prefer the crop below. It doesn’t look like it represents any of the angst of last week- it now looks more like mountains to me.

Night Peaks: